The Art of Accepting Your Rejection Call

Prepwork: Drink a lot of coffee so you can stay up late applying for jobs.
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Step 1: Apply to a lot of great jobs in your dream field with your dream degree that you just earned.

Step 2: Keep your diploma in it’s frame in the box… ready for your first office wall.

Step 3: Know that you might be in a cubicle.

Step 4: The Phone interview
1. Be exactly what they’re looking for.
2. Be yourself. But not too much of it.
3. Play up your enthusiasm for the job:
“I know that this is exactly where I want to be right now.”
Oh…. wait… that’s not playing it up. That’s my life. Yep, I do actually want to live in a “dorm” with 18 year olds, guiding them through the metaphorical $hit storm that is life.
4. Show them that you DO have weaknesses, when they’re actually strengths.
“I work too hard” — Employer: GREAT You’ll fit right in!
“I enjoy long days and minimal sleep” — Employer: We have the perfect position for you!
5. End with amazing questions that they’ve never heard before:
….. Oh, wait… I don’t have any of those…
6. Wait for a call-back.

The Call-Back
Me: “Hello, this is Lindsay.”
Potential Employer: “Hi, Lindsay this is such-and-such university. We’re glad we reached you, are you free to chat?”
Me: (Totally have not been waiting by the phone jumping everytime it rings only to see on CallerID that it’s just my parents asking me to get milk or bread from the store) “Yeah, definitely.”
Potential Employer: “Just wanted to let you know that we’ve offered the job to someone else and they have accepted, so our search process has concluded.”
Me: “Yeah, oh that’s great. I’m so excited for you and your department. We’ll keep in touch. I loved getting to know you all.”
Potential Employer: “Oh you’re so great, Lindsay. You’re going to be awesome where ever you go.”

So, something like this played out for me a few days ago…

My mom woke up this morning and told me that she had a nightmare that I didn’t get a job.

I told her quickly that the nightmare wasn’t just a dream. That actually happened yesterday 😉

Being my ever optimistic self, I know that this is just one speed bump on the way to a beautiful road trip. So, here’s to new beginnings. Again. And many more amazing opportunities to come.

Good luck to all my friends in the midst of job searches.
We ARE amazing and we all are going to be great.

We just have to convince the employers of this small detail 😉

The Puzzle Pieces of My Life: More on Narrative Therapy

My family has always told stories. In my mom’s struggle to get a voice for her fellow nurses, she orated her story of being a nurse for 35 years; she told of the babies she has delivered, the parents she has congratulated, and the couples she has consoled. In my dad’s role as a father, reiterating tales of his youth are few and far between because of the maltreatment he received as a child and young adult. However, he has re-narrated his childhood; he has re-membered it. He turned it from one of abuse and neglect to one of choices to be different from what he knew; choices that he himself will not make and roads that he will not go down.

I stole my theory of life from my sister Lauren. She has Asperger’s, an autism spectrum disorder, and happens to be especially adept at doing puzzles. Lauren can flip the puzzle to its reverse side and complete it only looking at the blank cardboard shapes without the picture to guide her. She is able to see at a glance how each little piece fits into the larger puzzle. Sometimes she does edges first. Sometimes she starts from a random point and works her way out. Sometimes, still, she starts many different areas and in the blink of an eye has found the links that fit them together perfectly. Lauren’s gift with puzzles led me to my life’s theory.

I was about thirteen when I realized that my life was made up of a sequence of events; my life was an unfinished puzzle. All of my stories that I have told are pieces of it that don’t always seem to fit together in the right ways, but, I have reasoned that this is because I still have more pieces to be found, shaped, and created. In this puzzle of life, there are many different ways to look at an event. I could take the single event as an isolated occurrence, or I can, as I so often do, fit the piece into a larger narrative.

This has made sense for many things that have happened in my life. The small routines of playing songs on Grandpa’s jukebox and then towards the end of his life, Grandpa picking his own song on it to which he and my mother danced. Falling in a lake and having a dramatic (not) near-death experience, taking swimming lessons to prevent this from happening again, and then joining the local swim team where I started my stint as the athlete that I would soon become and forever be. Wanting to quit basketball so many times, sticking with it, then quitting in college and feeling lost. Being able to find and join the Crew team where I found my place. Sustaining a career ending back injury, losing crew, having to become just a student again, and then finding the time to be there for the people who needed me most, including myself.

My stories at first are isolated events; individual pieces in my puzzle. Then, later, I contextualize them in the narrative of life. My life. I have the power, like my father, to re-narrate those stories as many times as I would like. I choose to put on a different set of lenses than the first time around when re-looking at a certain piece in my puzzle. I reimagine that piece as the beginning of a different story ending at present day or I fit that piece into the middle of a series of seemingly unrelated, but on second glance perfectly connected, pieces to my puzzle.

We can always re-member what we need to in order to give our lives meaning. A bad day can turn into a learning experience or a laughing matter within just a few days. A car accident can be a wake-up call or a chance to get your dream car. Any way you look at an event, it can tell a different story. As for the events in our stories, we are the authors. We are in control of placing our pieces of our puzzles in the right places. The places that make the most sense for right now.

This is why I love hearing people’s stories: I can hear them placing, arranging, and making sense of all of the different pieces in their life. This is why I will always ask to hear how someone got to where they are, or how they met their partner, or spent their week, month, life. People deserve to be given the chance to place their pieces over and over until it gives them the most meaning—and I intend to give people that chance.

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